Warning Cookies are used on this site to provide the best user experience. If you continue, we assume that you agree to receive cookies from this site. OK
Contact us for a price
Out of stock

We (2shahr) will add your email address to a special mailing list for this product. Once the product is in stock, you’ll get an email about it automatically, and your email address will be removed from the product’s mailing list.

The data will be visible to some members of our staff. If you’d like to have your personal data removed, send an email to sales@2shahr.net.

If you believe that your personal data has been misused, you have the right to lodge a complaint with a supervisory authority. We’re obliged by EU General Data Protection Regulation to let you know about this right; we don’t actually intend to misuse your data.

Add to wish list

Scientific classification

Kingdom: Plantae

(unranked): Angiosperms

(unranked): Eudicots

(unranked): Asterids

Order: Ericales

Family: Actinidiaceae

Genus: Actinidia

Species: A. chinensis

Binomial name

Actinidia chinensis

Habitat

In its native habitat Actinidia chinensis grows in thickets, thick (oak) forests (e.g. Quercus aquifolioides, Quercus oxyodon, Quercus lamellosa), and light secondary forests and bushland. A. chinensis prefers slopes and likes also to grow in ravines, top heights of 200-230m, relative to the local microclimate. In Western gardens it may range 30 feet in all directions, making it unsuitable for all but the largest spaces unless pruned back hard at the end of every growing season.

Origin

The origin of Actinidia chinensis is supposed to be the northern Yangtse river valley. In China, Actinidia chinensis is nowadays dispersed in the entire southeast of the country.

Herbarium

specimens, but not plants, were forwarded to the Royal Horticultural Society by the British plant hunter Robert Fortune, from which Jules Émile Planchon named the new genus in the London Journal of Botany, 1847. Charles Maries, collecting for Messrs Veitch noted it in Japan, but the introduction to Western horticulture was from E.H. Wilson, who sent seeds collected in Hupeh to Veitch in 1900.

My Wishlist (0)
Compare list (0)
My Cart (0)